Tag Archives: Teaching

Using Word Cards in Reading Instruction

I did a quick Facebook Live this week to discuss the use of word cards in reading instruction. I thought I would put that video with some tips in a blog post so that it is all in one place.

Using Word Cards in Reading Instruction

Tips for Using Word Cards in Reading Instruction

 

1) Don’t use word cards with words the student has never encountered. Word cards are for practicing words used in instruction, not for long lists of words never encountered before.

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Having Fun Teaching Rhyme Scheme

Teaching poetry can be a challenge. It is easy to get caught up in the mechanics of poetry when teaching about rhyme scheme. It is easy to get lost in imagery when teaching about meaning and depth of poetry.

Poetry Rap

Having Fun Teaching Rhyme Scheme

Sometimes you just need a little fun when you’re teaching rhyme scheme—like in the Facebook Live videos that my students made of me teaching the about the importance of syllabication in rhyme scheme development—using funny rhymes and even a little rapping.

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Podcast: Faith and Character Building for Littles

Podcast: Faith and Character Building for Littles

Welcome to another Wondering Wednesday podcast episode! In this audio presentation, Donna Reish (of Character Ink Press and Raising Kids With Character) answers questions about faith and character training for young children. Donna begins with the Five W’s and One H of Character Training, reminding parents that we must first have it in our hearts before we can give it to our children. She then delves into laying some foundations with toddlers. Finally, she talks about the four places and times that Deuteronomy tells us to teach our kids God’s Word and ways: when you rise up; when you sit in your house; when you walk by the way; and when you lie down. She gives examples and activities for each time period—focusing on getting to our children’s hearts with unconditional love, intentionality, prioritizing, and selflessness.

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Children & Chores: Create Systems Together

Children & Chores: Create Systems Together

One thing that makes it much easier for children to learn chores and household upkeep is for the children to work with you on developing systems. We as moms have a tendency to create the systems that we like in freezers, refrigerators, pantries, toy shelves, bookcases, kitchen cupboards, and more. And then when somebody comes in to do a chore or unload groceries or put something away, it is not done correctly. And we wonder why people keep messing up our systems!

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Age-Appropriate Chore Series

Age Appropriate Chore Series

I recently published an e-book titled Age-Appropriate Chores with printable posters for each age group (containing Chores to Do With Someone and Chores to Do By Themselves). It had a forward of several pages of chore tips. It was a freebie in January but is now available at our stores for a small price.

People have been enjoying those posters, so I decided to publish shortened versions of the posters (just the Chores to Do By Themselves) on the blog and for Pinterest. With that, I am going to run several chore tip blog posts as well. So stay tuned over the next few weeks as I write about chores and as we share these colorful memes.

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A Writing Tip for Eleventh Grade

A Writing Tip for Every Year: Eleventh Grade

Eleventh Grade: Guide your student in editing his papers.

Editing papers is one of many students’ most hated tasks. However, if our kids are guided in how to do this from the early grades, it will not feel so overwhelming to them. This post has suggestions for teaching the high schooler (and junior high student) editing tricks that they can use right away…

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A Writing Tip for Every Year: Tenth Grade

A Writing Tip for Every Year: Tenth Grade

Tenth Grade: Work on whatever type of writing is needed for your student next.

Usually at this level, a student has decided whether or not he will go to college. For the student who is planning to go to college, the writing pressure is really on by tenth grade—because of the dreaded SAT/ACT Essay (and the verbal part in general).

It is obvious that a college-bound tenth grader needs to work on the SAT or ACT Essay and the portions of an SAT/ACT preparatory book that will help him with the verbal parts of these exams.

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A Writing Tip for Tenth Grade

A Writing Tip for Every Year: Tenth Grade

Tenth Grade: Work on whatever type of writing is needed for your student next.

In high school, writing demands should be based, in part, on what the student needs at that time. I often have students who are writing for me in class as well as writing college entrance letters, SAT essays, contests projects, and more. If at all possible, we should focus on the type of writing that the student needs next. These tips explain this further..

Podcast: Age Appropriate Chores

Podcast: Age Appropriate Chores

Donna Reish, author of fifty language arts and writing books and the Raising Kids With Character seminar and blog, brings you this “chore” episode of Wondering Wednesday. This week Donna answers readers’ questions about age-appropriate chores. Donna introduces some keys to teaching children chores at all ages, including the importance of a set chore time, thorough training, and the difference between working with the child vs. the child working independently. Then she delves into various age groups and what are appropriate expectations for each one—with thorough, consistent training and follow up.

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A Writing Tip for Every Year: Ninth Grade

A Writing Tip for Every Year: Ninth Grade

Ninth Grade: Teach pre-writing skills that are needed for the type of writing your student is doing.

Besides the aforementioned “writing idea” problem we sometimes create when we do not direct our students in their writing, another difficulty is that of not equipping the student with the skills necessary in order to write what we are asking him to write. It is so difficult for a student to complete a project if he has not been given/taught the skills that are needed in order to write that project well.

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