Tag Archives: students

Independent Work Lists for Junior High and High School

Independent Work Lists for Junior High and High School Students

Now on to Junior High and High School!

The concept behind the Independent Work List is that it helps a student become, well, independent. In that way, the chart/list/planner should grow with the child—more independence/less neediness.

More responsibility/less spoon feeding from Mom.

These will be in no true order–just some things that I want to re-emphasize from the younger ages as well as things that pertain only to olders.

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How to Use Independent Work Lists for Elementary Children

How to Use Independent Work Lists for Elementary Students

Once you have determined that you do need the structure for your student that Independent Work Lists provide for your school, there are many questions to answer and decisions to make. And these decisions will be different according to ages.

Here are some tips for using Independent Work Lists With Elementary Children:

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Introducing Independent Work Lists for Students!

Introducing Independent Work Lists for Students

One of the problems that we hear about over and over again when we are out speaking is that
of students not completing everything that you want them to in any given day. AND keeping
kids on task.

Our solution: Independent Work Lists!

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Video: Using Check Lists for Student’s Independent Work

Using Check Lists for Students' Independent Work Lists

This week’s Wondering Wednesday answers readers’ questions about how to implement Independent Work Lists for children, especially junior high and high school by using daily check lists. (See the podcast episodes that introduces the concepts of Daily Duties and talks about using charts and lists, work order, teaching independence, and more in last week’s Wondering Wednesday podcast episode here.)

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Podcast Notes for “CLEP Testing for College Credit and/or a College Degree”

Podcast Notes: CLEP Testing for College Credit and/or a College Degree

play

Listen to the podcast here!


 

 

TWO CHOICES in “CLEP-ping”

(1) ALL (or nearly all) of a degree earned through CLEPs
(2) CLEP in lieu of taking courses in your degree (to save time and money)

 

ALL CLEP (or Nearly All) Considerations

1. Super great study skills/tester
2. Doesn’t mind having a less “distinguished degree”
3. Is getting a less specialized degree (more liberal arts/humanities/social
work/history/psychology, communications, etc.)
4. Can save TONS of money (especially over living on campus and getting a degree)

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Podcast: CLEP Testing for College Credit and/or a College Degree

Podcast: CLEP Testing for College Credit and/or a College Degree

 

Donna Reish, of Character Ink Press and Raising Kids With Character, brings you this episode about CLEP testing for college credit. Donna describes the two primary reasons for taking CLEP (College Level Equivalency Program) tests: (1) To test out of an entire degree (or most of it); (2) To earn college credit towards a degree that the student will be pursuing or is pursuing. She explains the steps her family has gone through to use the CLEP for both approaches (as some classes toward a nursing degree, for 3/4 of a degree, and for all of a degree except for two classes for which there were no tests available). She then details the steps you will want to go through to get the most out of this college testing option, focusing on how to decide if a student would be a good CLEP candidate, how to choose the exams to take, and how to prepare for the exams.

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A Writing Tip for Seventh Grade

A Writing Tip for Every Year - Seventh Grade

Seventh Grade: Teach your student to apply his grammar learning to writing.

While my students often groan when they are told to mark the Checklist Challenge for that week’s homework assignment, they know (and I know) that it really does help. A student just told me this week that her sister had her scan and email her a copy of her Checklist Challenge to use in college—because she had used our CC for every writing project and knew how helpful it can be in revising writing…..

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A Writing Tip for Fifth Grade

A Writing Tip for Every Year Fifth Grade

Fifth Grade: Teach students that a paragraph is a unit of thought.

Paragraph division is a difficult concept for students, especially when you don’t teach a paragraph as a unit of thought early on. This week’s tip teaches my strategy for making sure that kids beginning with their very first paragraph understand that a paragraph is a unit of thought.

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A Writing Tip for Every Year: Fifth Grade

A Writing Tip for Every Year Fifth Grade

Fifth Grade: Teach students that a paragraph is a unit of thought.

It is often in third, fourth, or fifth grade that students are expected to write more than one paragraph in a report, essay, or story. This is the point at which students start writing—and have no idea where to divide paragraphs (and sometimes where/when to end the paper!).

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