Sit and Set Pop Quiz With Answer Key!




      Sit Down While I Set Up a Quiz For You!



Sit and rise have I’s–and lie does too.
“Coz these are things that I, all by myself, can do.
Set, raise, and lay are words that you choose
When each one has an object after it to use.

Fill in the blanks below with the correct forms/tenses of sit/set.
  1. She _________ down and wept when she heard the news.
  2. They _______ down.
  3. They _______ the plants out.
  4. They will be _______ the clothes out beforehand.
  5. Yesterday, he ________ down to rest.
  6. They will ________ the clothes out to dry.
  7. He _________ down.
  8. He is ____________ down.
  9. They will be _________ the clothes out beforehand.
  10. She has _________ the clothes out beforehand.
  11. They have __________ down.
  12. He has ____________ down.
  13. They __________ the trap to catch the bear.
  14. They are __________ down.
  15. They will ________ the tent up at .





ANSWER KEY:


  • She sat down and wept when she heard the news.
  • They sit down.(or sat)
  • They set the plants out.
  • They will be setting the clothes out beforehand.
  • Yesterday, he sat down to rest.
  • They will set the clothes out to dry.
  • He sits down.
  • He is sitting down.
  • They will be setting the clothes out beforehand.
  • She has set the clothes out beforehand.
  • They have sat down.
  • He has sat down.
  • They set the trap to catch the bear.
  • They are sitting down.
  • They will set the tent up at .
  • Major Works and Minor Works Quiz With Answers

    Major Works and Minor Works Quiz With Answers

    M is for MAJOR WORKS AND MINOR WORKS!



    Are you as ready to move on from this topic as I am? With teaching it to one hundred students last week and writing about it here several times, I am just about “major and minored” out! However, we can’t leave such a misunderstood topic without a quiz!

    So here you go…..Decide in each sentence provide whether the title is a major work or minor work. (Answers below.)




    1. I used the encyclopedia essay titled Mammals for my report.

    2. I just got a new cd called Ballads for the Ballroom. (That sounds like a good idea–I should do that!)

    3. Have you ever read the book The Red Badge of Courage?

    4. My favorite dance song on my new cd is Could I Have This Dance?

    5. She assigned five chapters this week, starting with Non-Essential Information. (You guess it, LL readers–that is what we are going to study this week on here!)

    6. They said we could consult Wikipedia, but we aren’t allowed to cite it.

    7. Our new favorite boxed television show is Person of Interest.

    8. I haven’t received a Reader’s Digest magazine in years.

    9. My favorite composition series is Meaningful Composition.

    10. I am using their bonus book right now, called The SAT Essay and Other Timed Writing.



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    ANSWERS! Major Works are shown with Italics; Minor Works are shown with quotation marks. Explanations are in parentheses following each sentence.

    1. I used the encyclopedia essay titled, “Mammals,” for my report. (Encyclopedia essay title is a Minor Work--found within the encyclopedia, whose title is a Major Work.)

    2. I just got a new cd called Ballads for the Ballroom. (Musical compilation titles are Major Works–the song titles on/in the compilation are Minor Works.)

    3. Have you ever read the book The Red Badge of Courage? (Book titles are Major Works–the chapter titles within the book are Minor Works.)

    4. My favorite dance song on my new cd is “Could I Have This Dance?” (Song titles are Minor Works–the title of the songbook or cd that contains the song is the Major Work.)

    5. She assigned five chapters this week, starting with “Non-Essential Information.” (Chapter titles are Minor Works–the title of the book containing the chapters is the Major Work.)

    6. They said we could consult Wikipedia, but we aren’t allowed to cite it. 
    (Encyclopedia titles are Major Works–the titles of the essays within the encyclopedia are Minor Works.)

    7. Our new favorite boxed television show is Person of Interest. (Television show titles are Major Works–the titles of the scenes or chapters within the program are Minor Works.)

    8. I haven’t received a Reader’s Digest magazine in years. (Magazine or journal titles are Major Works–the titles of the articles within the magazine/journal are Minor Works.)

    9. My favorite composition series is Meaningful Composition
    (Book titles are Major Works–the chapters within the book are Minor Works.)

    10. I am using their bonus book right now, called The SAT Essay and Other Timed Writing. (Book titles are Major Works–the chapters within the book are Minor Works.)

    PUNCTUATION PUZZLE: The shepherd led them to the brook….

    PUNCTUATION PUZZLE—plus a couple of other errors for you to find!

    The shepherd lead them to the brook and they drank alot, because they were very, hot, and thirsty.


    Here is the answer with an explanation for each aspectbelow: The shepherd led them to the brook, and they drank a lot because they were very hot and thirsty.

     LED vs LEAD: The shepherd LED them to the brook……

          1.  LEAD (pronounced ledd with as short e) is only pronounced ledd when it refers to a metal or pencil graphite.           2. Otherwise LEAD is pronounced leed (long e) and is the current tense of the verb lead (LEED).                                     3. LED is the past tense of the verb LEAD (pronounced LEED, with a long e).


    CS ,cc CS–Do you remember these rules for compound sentences? 

    1. CS stands for complete sentence; cc stands for coordinating conjunction. 

    2. You can join one CS (complete sentence) with another CS by using a comma-cc (,For/ ,And/ ,Nor/ ,But/ ,Or/ ,Yet/ ,So). 

    3. You may not combine two complete sentences into one with a cc only–you must put a comma before it: The shepherd led them to the brook, AND they drank….



     ALOT vs A LOT:  ALOT is not one word; it should be two words–A LOT—meaning a bunch or a large amount: The shepherd led them to the brook, and they drank a lot….


    No comma before a subordinator at the end of a sentence unless it is a WHICH clause-

    1. You do not need a comma before the BECAUSE. 

    2. You do not hear a pause (like you would if it were a WHICH clause): The shepherd led them to the brook, and they drank a lot because they were very hot and thirsty.


    No Comma Between an adverb and the adjective it describes—

    1. Or more clearly put, no comma between a qualifier and a describer: VERY hot and thirsty (not VERY, hot, and thirsty).

    2.  Very is an adverb telling how hot (an adverb describing an adjective or qualifying it). 

    3. Tip for this: 

         a. If you can put an AND where you are trying to put the comma, then a comma is needed (in place of the and): they were muddy, hot, and thirsty (muddy AND hot AND thirsty). 

         b. If you cannot put an AND, do not put a comma: very AND hot—NO!). 

         c.  Also, do not use a comma when you have only two adjectives and you are placing an AND in between them–either use a comma (hot, thirsty) OR place an AND (hot and thirsty) but not both.

    day 95: sit and set pop quiz—answer key

    Sit and rise have I’s–and lie does too.
    “Coz these are things that I, all by myself, can do.
    Set, raise, and lay are words that you choose
    When each one has an object after it to use.
    1. She sat down and wept when she heard the news.
    2. They sit down.(or sat)
    3. They set the plants out.
    4. They will be setting the clothes out beforehand.
    5. Yesterday, he sat down to rest.
    6. They will set the clothes out to dry.
    7. He sits down.
    8. He is sitting down.
    9. They will be setting the clothes out beforehand.
    10. She has set the clothes out beforehand.
    11. They have sat down.
    12. He has sat down.
    13. They set the trap to catch the bear.
    14. They are sitting down.
    15. They will set the tent up at .
    How did you do? 🙂 Rise and raise coming soon!

    day 94: sit and set pop quiz!

    Sit and rise have I’s–and lie does too.
    “Coz these are things that I, all by myself, can do.
    Set, raise, and lay are words that you choose
    When each one has an object after it to use.
    Fill in the blanks below with the correct forms/tenses of sit/set.
    1. She _________ down and wept when she heard the news.
    2. They _______ down.
    3. They _______ the plants out.
    4. They will be _______ the clothes out beforehand.
    5. Yesterday, he ________ down to rest.
    6. They will ________ the clothes out to dry.
    7. He _________ down.
    8. He is ____________ down.
    9. They will be _________ the clothes out beforehand.
    10. She has _________ the clothes out beforehand.
    11. They have __________ down.
    12. He has ____________ down.
    13. They __________ the trap to catch the bear.
    14. They are __________ down.
    15. They will ________ the tent up at .

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